Category Archives: Mystery

2016 Mystery Finalists and Reviews

The following audiobooks were nominated in the 2016 Mystery Category. Reviews will be posted as they come in.

This category will be judged by Beccy from Audiothing Audiobook & Narrator Reviews. Would you like to join her? Send an email to armchairaudies@gmail.com.

Here are the nominees:

Mystery Banner 2016

  • All the Old Knives by Olen Steinhauer, read by Ari Fliakos and Juliana Francis Kelly
  • Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith, read by Robert Glenister
  • Corrupted by Lisa Scottoline, read by Kate Burton
  • Gun Street Girl by Adrian McKinty, read by Gerard Doyle
  • Malice in the Palace by Rhys Bowen, read by Katherine Kellgren
  • The Nature of the Beast by Louise Penny, read by Robert Bathurst

2015 Mystery Nominees and Reviews

The following audiobooks were nominated in the Mystery Category. Reviews will be posted as they come in.

This category will be judged by Susie from MissSusie’s Reading and Observations and Alexandra from The Sleepless Reader. Would you like to join them? Send an email to armchairaudies@gmail.com.

Here are the nominees:

MysteryBanner

  • The Dead Will Tell by Linda Castillo; Narrated by Kathleen McInerney from Macmillan Audio

“When books are told in the first person a good narrator is essential, and in this case Kathleen McInerney discreetly but confidently became Chief Burkholder. She was a good choice for this book – her voice is expressive but calm, which suited the Amish theme, but could also handle the action scenes. Also, she was comfortable with German words and sentences. I’ve added a couple of books to my Audible wish-list because of her, so that’s a good sign!” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

“Kathleen McInerney’s narration was really good she used a nice slight accent when she was voicing the Amish people and her male voices were fine and her narration of Kate was very well done.” ~ Miss Susie’s

Miss Susie’s Full Review

  • Hounded by David Rosenfelt; Narrated by Grover Gardner from Listen & Live Audio, Inc.

“I really liked the narration 🙂 For some reason, Grover Gardner’s voice reminded me of Sheriff Amos inMurder, She Wrote. Haven’t seen an episode in ages, but Gardner immediately brought Cabot Cove to mind, in a sort of genial, look-at-us-happily-solving-murders-among-friends kind of way. He brought to life a book I’d have dropped after a couple of chapters. My only tiny quibble was his struggle with Latino accents.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • Malice by Keigo Higashino; Narrated by Jeff Woodman from Macmillan Audio

“About the narration, I felt Jeff Woodman’s strength is to be able to make each character unique. I’ve still to decide if this always is a good thing, because it can work like book covers with faces: it plants images in your mind instead of letting you create them. For instance, Detective Kaga sounded meticulous, rational, introverted and Nonoguchi sounded old and frail. These were things I got more from their voices than what they were saying. Woodman also faltered a bit on the Japanese names, especially at the beginning.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • Missing You by Harlan Coben; Narrated by January LaVoy from Brilliance Publishing

“I know Miss Susie, my fellow mystery category armchair judge, disagrees with me, but I felt that LaVoy’s narration was often over the top – she positively purred at some points (see her interpretation of a drunk guy trying to pick up women at a bar). On the positive side, LaVoy’s narration style really matched the book, so she was a good casting choice. I guess?” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • Providence Rag by Bruce DeSilva; Narrated by Jeff Woodman from Audible, Inc.

Providence Rags probably has the biggest number of speaking parts of all the books in this category and Woodman really does an amazing job in distinguishing each one of them. Often it’s a very subtle different, but just enough for the listener to easily follow a dialogue without getting confused about who’s talking. He managers several different accents, intonations and pitches, which is a hard thing to pull off and a sure indication of the narration’s quality. My first audiobook by him, but definitely not the last.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith; Narrated by Robert Glenister from Hachette Audio

“As an narrator, Glenister started off with an advantage because I can’t resist a British accent 😉 He doesn’t get as many opportunities to shine as Woodman (see above), but for such a deep voice, it’s pretty impressive the range Glenister managers to pull off. He doesn’t make women sound too whinny or childish and is the perfect voice for Cormoran (rough with teddy-bearish glimpses). There were some characters that could easily come out as stereotypes if read by a less professional narrator, but Glenister keeps them well under control.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

2014 Mystery Nominees and Reviews

The following audiobooks were nominated in the Mystery Category. Reviews will be posted as they come in.

This category will be judged by Susie from Miss Susie’s Reading & Observations. Would you like to join her? Send an email to armchairaudies@gmail.com.

Here are the nominees:

MysteryBanner

  • Death and the Lit Chick (A St Just Mystery, Book #2; by G.M. Malliet; Narrated by Davina Porter; Dreamscape Media, LLC)
  • The Enemy of My Enemy (Brainrush, Book #2; by Richard Bard; Narrated by R.C. Bray; Richard Bard)
  • Heirs and Graces (Royal Spyness, Book #7; by Rhys Bowen; Narrated by Katherine Kellgren; Audible, Inc.)
  • He’s Gone (by Deb Caletti; Narrated by Cassandra Campell; Tantor Media)
  • Rage Against the Dying (by Becky Masterman; Narrated by Judy Kaye; Macmillan Audio)
  • Unleashed (Andy Carpenter, Book #11; by David Rosenfelt; Narrated by Grover Gardner; Listen & Live Audio)

2013 Mystery Nominees and Reviews

The following audiobooks were nominated in the Mystery Category. This category is being reviewed by Susie from Miss Susie’s Reading and Observations and Melanie from Overreader. Sign up here.

AndWhenSheWasGood

And When She Was Good by Laura Lippman and narrated by Linda Emond

Reviews

Overreader

Heloise isn’t an immediately likable character. Very bristly, defensive about her life (her public life and her very very private career life), and full of actions even she questions. But Lippman layers on more and more about Heloise, and I found myself way more in her shoes than I’d thought possible

Emond is a skilled narrator, and I always feel I can just relax when she’s reading the book.

TheBeautifulMystery

The Beautiful Mystery by Louise Penny and narrated by Ralph Cosham

Reviews

Overreader

The mystery itself is adroit and complex, and the effect of the monastery on Gamache and on Beauvoir is compelling. Both men are dealing with the long fallout of a previous case, and being isolated has brought much of it to the fore. I was grabbed tight by their struggles and enchanted, as well, by the chants and the monastic community.

MissSusie’s Reading and Observations

He has a silky yet gruff voice that I love, his slight French/Québec accent is just enough to let us know where these books are set but not so much that the accent is annoying or hard to understand. Towards the end of this one Cosham really brings the raw emotions to the surface beautifully.

TheGoodThiefsGuidetoVegas

The Good Thief’s Guide to Vegas by Chris Ewan and narrated by Simon Vance

Reviews

Overreader

 

Ewan’s writing is bright and clean, and Charlie is self-deprecating and not as smooth or adroit as he’d like to be, a great character to hang out with, even though he’ll embroil you in all sorts of dangerous nonsense.

Simon Vance ‘s delivery is smooth and clean and engaging, and he picks up perfectly on the emotional sub-texts as well as the energy of the text.

HushMoney

Hush Money by Chuck Greaves and narrated by Dan Butler

Reviews

MissSusie’s Reading and Observations

Dan Butler’s narration was good but I’m honestly not sure if it was award worthy. He had a few different characterizations but they weren’t always consistent, but his narration of the main character was well done and I felt he captured Jack’s snarky humor very well. I would listen to other narrations by Dan Butler.

TheNightmare

The Nightmare by Lars Kepler and narrated by Mark Bramhall

Reviews

Overreader

The mellifluous Mark Bramhall reads the Jonna Linna series. He is a master of voices and tone, and there’s something very fluid about the way he narrates.