2015 Mystery Nominees and Reviews

The following audiobooks were nominated in the Mystery Category. Reviews will be posted as they come in.

This category will be judged by Susie from MissSusie’s Reading and Observations and Alexandra from The Sleepless Reader. Would you like to join them? Send an email to armchairaudies@gmail.com.

Here are the nominees:

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  • The Dead Will Tell by Linda Castillo; Narrated by Kathleen McInerney from Macmillan Audio

“When books are told in the first person a good narrator is essential, and in this case Kathleen McInerney discreetly but confidently became Chief Burkholder. She was a good choice for this book – her voice is expressive but calm, which suited the Amish theme, but could also handle the action scenes. Also, she was comfortable with German words and sentences. I’ve added a couple of books to my Audible wish-list because of her, so that’s a good sign!” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

“Kathleen McInerney’s narration was really good she used a nice slight accent when she was voicing the Amish people and her male voices were fine and her narration of Kate was very well done.” ~ Miss Susie’s

Miss Susie’s Full Review

  • Hounded by David Rosenfelt; Narrated by Grover Gardner from Listen & Live Audio, Inc.

“I really liked the narration 🙂 For some reason, Grover Gardner’s voice reminded me of Sheriff Amos inMurder, She Wrote. Haven’t seen an episode in ages, but Gardner immediately brought Cabot Cove to mind, in a sort of genial, look-at-us-happily-solving-murders-among-friends kind of way. He brought to life a book I’d have dropped after a couple of chapters. My only tiny quibble was his struggle with Latino accents.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • Malice by Keigo Higashino; Narrated by Jeff Woodman from Macmillan Audio

“About the narration, I felt Jeff Woodman’s strength is to be able to make each character unique. I’ve still to decide if this always is a good thing, because it can work like book covers with faces: it plants images in your mind instead of letting you create them. For instance, Detective Kaga sounded meticulous, rational, introverted and Nonoguchi sounded old and frail. These were things I got more from their voices than what they were saying. Woodman also faltered a bit on the Japanese names, especially at the beginning.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • Missing You by Harlan Coben; Narrated by January LaVoy from Brilliance Publishing

“I know Miss Susie, my fellow mystery category armchair judge, disagrees with me, but I felt that LaVoy’s narration was often over the top – she positively purred at some points (see her interpretation of a drunk guy trying to pick up women at a bar). On the positive side, LaVoy’s narration style really matched the book, so she was a good casting choice. I guess?” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • Providence Rag by Bruce DeSilva; Narrated by Jeff Woodman from Audible, Inc.

Providence Rags probably has the biggest number of speaking parts of all the books in this category and Woodman really does an amazing job in distinguishing each one of them. Often it’s a very subtle different, but just enough for the listener to easily follow a dialogue without getting confused about who’s talking. He managers several different accents, intonations and pitches, which is a hard thing to pull off and a sure indication of the narration’s quality. My first audiobook by him, but definitely not the last.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

  • The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith; Narrated by Robert Glenister from Hachette Audio

“As an narrator, Glenister started off with an advantage because I can’t resist a British accent 😉 He doesn’t get as many opportunities to shine as Woodman (see above), but for such a deep voice, it’s pretty impressive the range Glenister managers to pull off. He doesn’t make women sound too whinny or childish and is the perfect voice for Cormoran (rough with teddy-bearish glimpses). There were some characters that could easily come out as stereotypes if read by a less professional narrator, but Glenister keeps them well under control.” ~ The Sleepless Reader

The Sleepless Reader’s Full Review

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